Image: Supplied

Jonathan Anderson has derived creativity and innovation from the years spent in lockdown and the hiatus from physical fashion shows. His analogue franchise of presenting his collections as a “show in a box” sees its final iteration as a reinvention of a pin-up calendar. Shot by his long time friend, and JW Anderson collaborator, Juergen Teller, it is a showcase of an unfiltered reality, “humanity in the mundane” and includes the iconic photographer immortalising himself as a black-brief clad pin-up model. Anderson says of the shoot, “There’s no retouching, it’s a totally unfiltered reality.”

Juergen Teller has never been a simple fashion photographer, his works and aesthetics have provided movements, subcultures and fashion movements with imagery and icons. His inimitable unfiltered lens, coupled with Anderson’s eschewing of pandemic-fashion norms, is the perfect last step in the JW Anderson pandemic playbook of publicity. Having eschewed the mainstream releases’ usage of edited shoots, films and strobe-lit-runways — their most recent intimate collaboration is the quintessential extension of Anderson’s physical delivery of intricate boxes of photos, prints, posters and cut-outs in “memory” boxes to fashion editors; an organic attempt to mimic the physical and sensuous experience of experiencing a physical show, and all of the attributed stimuli.

Speaking to Hypebeast Magazine about his Show in a Box presentations in 2021, Anderson spoke about nostalgia and a physical movement away from digital memories, saying, “I liked this idea of creating something which felt a bit like going back to school … When I was younger, we used to get our pictures taken at school and you’d get these packs of photos and frames. I liked that concept of each of the photos being able to stand on their own. You could even put it on your mantelpiece.”

Image: Supplied
Image: Supplied

The next step in a movement geared towards preserving the physicality of pre-pandemic experiences, models clad in the prêt-à-porter creations of the British designer star in a real calendar. Teller’s go-to disruption of the fashion status quo, the contemporary collection and the presentation of the collection plays with the unwritten rules of fashion and distorts the seriousness of the industry; the reigning pretentiousness is simultaneously overturned and then revelled in.

Image: Supplied
Image: Supplied

Anderson, to AnOther Magazine, said about his collection.

“I felt like a calendar was a hopeful symbol of 2022. You know, you map out your year with a calendar. I’ve been really enjoying working with Juergen and randomly saw Mona [Tougaard] on holiday.”  The self-portraits of Teller were coupled with the two models, Mona Tougaard and Abby Champion. Anderson wanted to focus on the ‘bluntness’ of the shoot, coupled with his items, and what better way to do that then turn the camera on the photographer and throw two acclaimed models into the mix? 

He continues: “I wanted to explore a new chapter with this collection. It’s about coming to the end of a cycle to restart a cycle. You know — the two-piece looks, the idea of the shift dress. It’s about something that is very blunt, a singular look. So that when you go into 2022 you’re going in without any baggage. I feel like if you spoke to me five years ago I would have been rushing. I feel like as you get older, you realise if you rush you hit it wrong. That’s what has been exciting about the pandemic, you can think: where can clothing go?

You can view some of the calendar pages, and the JW Anderson S/S22 Women’s ready-to-wear collection, down below or on www.jwanderson.com

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