Bowls of ramen.
Bowls of ramen.
Image: 123RF/Saitharn Samathong

The 2019 Rugby World Cup kicks off on September 20 in the tiny Pacific Island nation of Japan. Land Rover is both a global partner to biggest rugby tournament in the world, and a proud partner of the Springboks too.

Because we’re Wanted, we’ve curated the coolest, smartest and most unique itinerary for you — in between cheering on the Boks, of course. We’ve taken our inspiration from the Range Rover Sport SVR, designed especially for the Springbok team. In this third and final instalment of a three-part series, we look at art, music, food, and sports attractions. 

1. LET THEM EAT RAMEN | RAUMEN MUSEUM

If you can imagine it, certainly Japan has done it. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum is a food-themed amusement park offering restaurants, gift shops, and “ramen shops showcased in a street-scape replication from the year 1958, Japan.

Finding the best ramen in Japan would be a lifelong quest.
Finding the best ramen in Japan would be a lifelong quest.
Image: Supplied

It was in this year that the world’s first instant ramen was invented,” the website reads. The experience has been described as peculiar and somewhat rigid but worth the visit, according to some online reviews.

Bizarre or worth it? You decide.

2. EAT THE FRESHEST SUSHI IN TOWN | TSUKIJI OUTER MARKET

If you can’t get a booking at Sukiyabashi Jiro, the world-famous, three Michelin-starred sushi restaurant in Ginza, check out Tsukiji Outer Market instead. It’s one of the best places to enjoy fresh seafood — delivered first thing from its wholesale arm, Toyosu Market — and relocated to bigger, more modern premises last year.

At the latter, you can even watch tuna auctions taking place from the swish observation decks (though you need to book in advance), and take in views of Tokyo Bay from the rooftop garden. Back at Tsukiji Market, you can enjoy fresh sushi for breakfast or lunch from 5am to early afternoon.

Fish at the market.
Fish at the market.
Image: 123RF/Mariusz Prusaczyk

3. BOOK INTO JAPAN’S FIRST DISPERSED HOTEL | ENSO ANGO

The idea behind the “dispersed hotel” concept, which originated in Italy, is to bring communities together by scattering the hotel’s amenities around town — a restaurant here, a guest room there, a spa way over there — essentially “forcing” guests to enjoy the many aspects that an area has to offer.

Enso Ango in Kyoto.
Enso Ango in Kyoto.
Image: Supplied

Japan’s first dispersed hotel, by the new brand Ango Hotels, is in Kyoto and comprises a collection of five buildings that are all within walking distance of one another and described as being “out of the static loop of large hotels and staged photo opportunities”. Its furniture and uniforms were designed by Japanese and Swedish artists, plus Enso Ango offers a zen meditation session with Buddhist priests, cooking classes, guided night runs, yoga, tatami mat workshops, and more.  

Visit the Land Rover website for more information. Join the #DriveBeyond conversation on Twitter and Instagram.

This article was paid for by Land Rover, proud vehicle partner to the Springboks.

© Wanted 2019 - If you would like to reproduce this article please email us.
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