Upside-down lemon tart.
Upside-down lemon tart.
Image: Supplied

JOBURG

The Test Kitchen Carbon

The talk of the town has undoubtedly been the relocation, reinvention, and evolution of award-winning chef Luke Dale Roberts’ The Test Kitchen. The new expression in Dunkeld is called The Test Kitchen Carbon, and is designed in a similar vein to the Cape Town version’s “dark room”. Dale Roberts, head chef Tyron Gentry, and the team present an impressive tasting menu that sees The Test Kitchen’s signatures joined by some seriously stellar new dishes. There are the classics — the billionaire’s shortbread and the pork scratchings with a flagon of beer foam.

Then there are a paella-style risotto with crayfish and a lemon-and-calamari oil; succulent roast duck accompanied by roasted ginger-and-orange tofu with noodles and a master-stock dressing; and a decadent Wagyu beef rendang shabu-shabu with a mushroom dumpling for the mains. The meal ends with upside-down lemon tart with purple shiso sorbet, or textures of chocolate and mascarpone with smoked white-chocolate ice cream. The kitchen team has also created a range of inventive cocktails, while wine or non-alcoholic pairing options are available with the meal.

The full menu runs 11 courses, while a reduced lunch menu serves up eight courses.

thetestkitchencarbon.co.za

COPENHAGEN

Geranium 

Chef Rasmus Kofoed has embraced a new direction at his world-renowned restaurant Geranium, in Copenhagen, having reworked the interiors, menu, and overall experience. The restaurant currently sits at No. 2 on The World’s 50 Best Restaurant Awards and has boasted three Michelin stars since first receiving the accolade in 2016.

“Danish tradition” salted herring in crispy algae with dill stems & aquavit.
“Danish tradition” salted herring in crispy algae with dill stems & aquavit.
Image: Supplied

Kofoed, who uses organic, bio-dynamic, and seasonal ingredients sourced from across Scandinavia to create a multi-sensory culinary experience, once again pushes the boundaries.“I had been thinking about taking Geranium in a new direction for a while, and now I feel it’s time to change. The world is changing, and we need to follow up.” As a result, Geranium has gone even more sustainable, in terms of not only produce but also people, mindset, and environment.“I woke up in the middle of the night with so many ideas and a clear vision in my head that I had to get up and write them down,” Kofoed explains.

The biggest change is the decision to no longer serve meat. This decision was guided by the way the chef eats at home. “My menu has always been focused on vegetables and ingredients from the ocean. I want the menu at Geranium to be authentic and reflect what I choose and like to eat.”The new menu, titled “The Spring Universe”, is a culinary spectacular divided into three stages — appetisers, savoury servings, and sweets.It features vegetarian, plant-based, and seafood dishes, served up in Geranium’s signature style that seamlessly balances intricate detailing and restraint, while paying homage to nature.T

he 22-course menu includes dishes such as “Danish tradition” salted herring in crispy algae with dill stems and aquavit; forest mushrooms with beer, smoked egg yolk, pickled hops, and rye bread; and a cloudberry, pumpkin, and white-chocolate dessert. Accompanying the new menu is co-owner, wine director, and general manager Søren Ørbek Ledet’s impressive wine list, which has 4 300 listings. Reservations open 90 days in advance.

geranium.dk/en/

Geranium’s Søren Ørbek Ledet in the wine cellar.
Geranium’s Søren Ørbek Ledet in the wine cellar.
Image: Geranium

 From the April edition of Wanted, 2022.

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