Curves: Targa Lounge chair.
Curves: Targa Lounge chair.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

1. PANTONE LIVING CORAL

Pantone 16-1546 Living Coral burst onto the scene just weeks ago as the 20th Pantone® Colour of the Year. 2019’s in vogue colour, as selected by the globe’s leader in colour standards, is juicy, energetic and uplifting and is a blend or orange and pink with a golden undertone. Living Coral is playful, effervescent and cheery but has a humanizing, warm and life affirming side too, say the brand. 

For interiors, Living Coral has a dual offering: either throw caution to the wind and splash it onto a wall as a feature and something of a shot to the arm; or introduce it in accessories that are high on texture. Living Coral’s inherent association with tactility and human connection means that it’s an ideal partner for cosier, heavier textures like wool, upholstery and velvet.

Pantone Colour of the Year, Living Coral.
Pantone Colour of the Year, Living Coral.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

2. PALLADIANA TERRAZZO

You’ve seen terrazzo flourish from its roots as a traditional Venetian type of flooring to its current manifestations in product design and digital graphics. Just look to Ferm Living’s aptly named Terrazzo wallpaper and product range with its muted shades and frivolous pattern to see how far it has been abstracted.

Ferm Living Bamboo Cup.
Ferm Living Bamboo Cup.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown
Palladiana terrazzo wallpaper by Ferm Living.
Palladiana terrazzo wallpaper by Ferm Living.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

But the next gen of this marble chip product is palladiana terrazzo. In this incarnation, you’ll see much larger pieces of marble slab which have been broken up, painstakingly arranged by hand and then filled in with poured terrazzo. It’s redolent of crazy paving but has more glamour and major retro appeal. Already ahead of the curve Tashas laid a palladiana floor in their new Marc outlet in Sandton.

Tashas at The Marc palladiana terrazzo floor.
Tashas at The Marc palladiana terrazzo floor.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown
Palladiana terrazzo wallpaper by Ferm Living.
Palladiana terrazzo wallpaper by Ferm Living.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

3. ART DECO

Having taken its cue from a mix of other styles and movements, one of them being Cubism, another Mayan, the Art Deco style of the 1920’s and 30’s is an opulent aesthetic that packs a punch. Who could forget Baz Luhrmann’s Great Gatsby?

Glamorous and full of rich details, this luxe look hits all the right notes. While the revival of art deco is admittedly a little more subdued than its predecessor, you’ll still notice the style’s use of metallics (particularly brass), black accents, mirror, decorative lights and simple geometry.

4. CURVES

Ovals, ellipses, circles, crescents….we can assure you they’ll be everywhere this year, especially in furniture. Look to Wiener GTV Design’s Targa Lounge chair and the Allegory Desk, both of which hit the nail on the head with their generous curves in bent beech. Not only is this trend reminiscent of classical design and architecture, but of the 1970’s too. Wiener GTV is available exclusively through Generation.

Wiener GTV Design’s Targa Lounge chair.
Wiener GTV Design’s Targa Lounge chair.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown
Wiener GTV Design’s Allegory Desk.
Wiener GTV Design’s Allegory Desk.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

Think dining chairs with upholstered crescent shaped backs, lamps with two dimensional circular bases and shades, arched door frames and gently curved silhouettes on larger furniture pieces. Even the humble dot will return to design, but this time up-scaled for a more graphic result, a la Popham Design’s Arch tiles, which give different geometric effects depending on how they’re arranged.

Popham Design’s Arch tiles.
Popham Design’s Arch tiles.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown
Popham Design’s Arch tiles.
Popham Design’s Arch tiles.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown

5. MAXIMALISM

More is more, says this year’s maxi trend. But be warned, it’s a case of embracing personality and character in a space, not quantity. Here, layering is key, be it patterning (think Ardmore), texture or a collection of treasured travel finds. 

There’s a difference between a generosity and hoarding, points out decorator Liam Mooney who has mastered this approach. “Having a lot of stuff that you don't love makes you a hoarder, not a maximalist. Constantly edit and refine your eye, forget about interior design and rather focus on populating your life with objects that turn you on!”

Layering is key to achieving the maximalism trend.
Layering is key to achieving the maximalism trend.
Image: Supplied / Mila Crewe-Brown
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